“Fartie Artie!” taunted Arthur’s classmates countless times a day after his tragic mistake.

The story was that one day when home alone after school, he had been playing with matches and accidentally caught the curtains on fire. He had burned his home down. And now the bullies taunting him would not stop.

Arthur was two or three years older than I was, so I had been unaware of his existence before this event. But now I continued to notice taunting classmates evacuating whatever table he sat down at for lunch.

My second-grade self felt horrible for Arthur in his shunning. I worried to my mom about it. I was afraid Arthur would never feel he belonged again.

She asked me a question I had never thought about: “What do you think Jesus would do if he were a student at your school?”

I grudgingly said, “He would probably go sit with him.”

But Jesus would have been a boy and would have probably known Arthur.

“But I don’t even know him.”

Mom agreed and was quiet.

Then a bit later, “Do you think it would be okay with Jesus if I took my little sister with me?”

Mom assured me that she thought Jesus would approve. Fortunately, my first-grade sister was good-natured and very willing to accompany me on this mission.

The next day when we sat down across from Arthur and said, “Hi,” he ignored us except to move as far away from us as possible. This was NOT part of our plan.

My mom assured me that it did not mean our joining him was the wrong thing to do. She encouraged us to give him time. So we did.

I’m not actually sure that Arthur ever spoke to us. After all, girls our age definitely had cooties. Everyone knew that.

But after several days of our odd lunches, a couple of my friends joined me and my sister. Later a couple of his friends joined him.

After a few days of our segregated groups eating at the same table, I decided our task was finished. I never noticed bullies taunting or isolating him again.

Maybe that would have happened naturally in the same number of days—just because kids would have gotten sick of teasing him. We will never know.

I certainly never had a chance to tell Arthur or anyone else that the reason we were joining him is that we were trying to be like Jesus. They will never know.

But my mom’s question for me and her quiet encouragement of me and my sister in our mission taught us a lot about the character of Jesus.

She taught us that Jesus does not shun people who feel like losers. Jesus does not taunt people who really mess up. He loves us all and wants us to show his love to those around us—especially when they mess up.

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